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Mission, Vision & Values

  • Mission: To develop leadership and professional competencies among Kurdish women while cultivating a spirit of collaboration and transparency in the empowerment of women in politics.
  • Vision: Kurdish women’s leadership is realized to be essential in Kurdish community. Fifty percent of political arena and its leadership belong to women.
  • Values: Engagement, Collaboration, Transparency, Making a difference, Friendship, Networking, Creativity, Being expressive, Being innovative, Expand knowledge, Critical thinking, Thriving, Making progress, Personal and community development, Making a change.

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Kurdish Feminism

  • Feminism is a multidimensional and intellectual vision and also a liberation movement in order to eradicate all forms of discrimination and inequality. By understanding differences in various societies and according to parameters such as political and national oppression, Kurdish feminism will choose particular solutions and strategies for Kurdistan Society as a stateless nation. Kurdish feminism struggle for women’s rights and national rights simultaneously, because national oppression in all its dimensions is the main cause of the “double discrimination” that Kurdish women are always its main victim.

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Goals

  • Kurdistan Feminist Party tries to promote the role of women in the course of the transition to democracy, governance and political management, increasing the participation of women in the political area and civil society in all levels particularly in party, local, regional, national and state decisions, and also tries to promote the position of Kurdish women by creating profound social and cultural changes in society.
  •  Kurdistan Feminist Party is a secular party regarding separation of religion from the state and removing the sacredness of power. Inseparable and universal values of human rights based on…

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News

Two Kurdish Women Visit State Department

Senam Mohamad the representative of Rojava (part of Kurdistan located in Syria) and Roya Toloui representative of Kurdistan Feminist Party (from Rojhelat, part of Kurdistan located in Iran) visited State Department on Friday, March 6th. They met Tom Malinowski, the Assistant Secretary of state and discussed Kurdish women situation in terms of participation in politics, democracy and defense against ISIS. Malinowski published the photo of meeting in his Twitter: Met two Kurdish women from Syria and Iran. Both working to build safer more democratic societies for their people. He added: A Kurdish region that upholds women’s social and political rights, would have…

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Articles

Silence Did Not Protect Farinaz Khosravani

By Elahe Amani

Audre Lorde, feminist scholar of 1970s once said, “Your silence will not protect you”  and women globally know this reality.

While gender justice has moved closer from margin to the center of global agenda particularly during the last 40 years, still patriarchal power structure is deep rooted in many parts of the world. One billion rising to end gender violence is the manifestation of one of the many campaigns to end gender based violence in public as well as private, in home as well as …

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Statement

Freedom of Dress is a Basic Human Right!

Limiting social liberties has often started with repressing women and violating their rights. Freedom of dress is a right everyone is entitled to. Clothing is a matter of choice, and people should be free to wear what they like to wear. Just as it is acceptable to have different ideologies and beliefs, it is also common to have different styles of clothing.When, from an ideological perspective, a certain style of clothing is designated for women to wear a covering which defines women dressing turns into enslavement which confiscates women’s rights. Religious ideologies objectify women, turning them into properties of men…

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  • where the power is, there women are not.

    Helga Nowotny

  • Women have served all these centuries as looking glasses possessing the power of reflecting the figure of man at twice its natural size.

    Virginia Woolf

  • The feminist movement should offer a “realistic evaluation of ‘wartime’ feminism or feminism ‘among nations without a state’ or the feminism of ‘women who represent national and religious minorities’ who demand their rights from the majority.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The impact of national and ethnic struggles on feminism should not be ignored because, “the truth is that the women of national and ethnic minorities face not only cultural differences but also differences resulting from the uneven distribution of political power and hence political, social and economic inequalities and problems which in turn undoubtedly intensify men’s violence against women or even women’s violence against women.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The responsibility of Kurdish feminism is to “criticize the roots of violence and prejudices against women and the barriers to women’s development in all their dimensions…to comprehend and define the thin line between war-mongering and self-defense. . . to allow women to reach the understanding that the elevation of their status and their emancipation is only possible through relying on ‘their own capabilities’ and not through mindlessly following political men and patriarchal political organizations that claim to seek women’s rights but are in their practice far from their beautiful slogans.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The responsibility of those feminists who come from the dominant Persian ethnicity, is not to treat women of national minorities in a “paternalistic” and “condescending” manner or to constantly accuse them of “separatism” for challenging discrimination against national minorities. Chauvinistic and paternalistic attitudes and constant accusations of “separatism” thrown at Kurdish feminists “neutralize the effect of years of struggle on the part of Kurdish and Persian feminists in creating mutual understanding and sympathy for women’s rights.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The armed women of ISIL aim to completely destroy freedom, democracy, peaceful coexistence and civility. Whereas, the world can witness that the Kurdish women Peshmarga are giving their lives to defend human values in the Middle East and for the sake of the rest of the world.”

    Trouska Sadeghi

  • where the power is, there women are not.

    Helga Nowotny

  • Women have served all these centuries as looking glasses possessing the power of reflecting the figure of man at twice its natural size.

    Virginia Woolf

  • The feminist movement should offer a “realistic evaluation of ‘wartime’ feminism or feminism ‘among nations without a state’ or the feminism of ‘women who represent national and religious minorities’ who demand their rights from the majority.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The impact of national and ethnic struggles on feminism should not be ignored because, “the truth is that the women of national and ethnic minorities face not only cultural differences but also differences resulting from the uneven distribution of political power and hence political, social and economic inequalities and problems which in turn undoubtedly intensify men’s violence against women or even women’s violence against women.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The responsibility of Kurdish feminism is to “criticize the roots of violence and prejudices against women and the barriers to women’s development in all their dimensions…to comprehend and define the thin line between war-mongering and self-defense. . . to allow women to reach the understanding that the elevation of their status and their emancipation is only possible through relying on ‘their own capabilities’ and not through mindlessly following political men and patriarchal political organizations that claim to seek women’s rights but are in their practice far from their beautiful slogans.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The responsibility of those feminists who come from the dominant Persian ethnicity, is not to treat women of national minorities in a “paternalistic” and “condescending” manner or to constantly accuse them of “separatism” for challenging discrimination against national minorities. Chauvinistic and paternalistic attitudes and constant accusations of “separatism” thrown at Kurdish feminists “neutralize the effect of years of struggle on the part of Kurdish and Persian feminists in creating mutual understanding and sympathy for women’s rights.”

    Roya Toloui

  • The armed women of ISIL aim to completely destroy freedom, democracy, peaceful coexistence and civility. Whereas, the world can witness that the Kurdish women Peshmarga are giving their lives to defend human values in the Middle East and for the sake of the rest of the world.”

    Trouska Sadeghi


Kurdish Women’s Anthem

Women in Latin American movements

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP